BARBARA NOAH

It is with great excitement that I share my “Likely Stories” Hatchfund project. It will support the completion and exhibition of the second half of my Likely Stories series. Work from the series so far can be seen on this website in Recent Series. They are archival pigment prints, visionary surrogate selfies in full throttle can-do mode that are deadpan homages to the long shot and the grandeur of distant skies, in which viewers ascend to improbable, transcendent heights, wryly reflective of the humor and pathos of the desire for extraordinary experience. I am aiming to raise funds for supplies, printing fees, partial editions, and framing. If you can support this project with a tax-deductible donation, in any capacity, together we can make this work a reality!

To learn more, please visit my project page, which also has more information about perks you will receive for your donation:
www.hatchfund.org/project/likely_stories_series

For additional information about the series, I also have a Hatchfund showcase page here:
www.hatchfund.org/showcase/likely_stories_series_so_far

The video about the project is at the project link above, but it can also be viewed on YouTube at:
youtu.be/B-eW7g_KhIc

A heartfelt thank you to the donors who have supported this project so far!
Steve Szilagyi, Allan McCollum, Valerie Schurman, Tom Douglas, Jacqueline Barnett, Casey Curran, Larry Reid, Claudia Bach, James Olson, Kathryn Altus, Erik Rostad, Dana Taft, Doug Bayley, Bill Ritchie, Karen Guzak, Judith Corona, Joan Stuart Ross, Judy Noah, Grace Noah, Daniel Takashima, Danielle Baker, Gene McMahon, Barbara Peterson, Alice Anne Focke, and anonymous donors.

Barbara is included in the exhibition Making Our Mark at the Bellevue Arts Museum through April 8, 2018. In the distant past, the Earth revolved off its axis after an asteroid strike, which resulted in species extinctions and other cataclysmic events. Barbara’s piece in the exhibition, Revolution, is an image of the Earth as a bowling ball and a future-shock face. It is a response to that moment in history, as well as to climate change. The piece was selected by curator Michael W. Monroe, Director Emeritus of BAM, Curator-in-Charge of the Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian American Art Museum, for the exhibition.

Thanks to Michael Upchurch in the Seattle Times Jan. 2nd, who wrote about my work the “Making Our Mark” show at the Bellevue Arts Museum:
“For me, the eye-catching figurative pieces are the highlight of the show….‘Revolution (climate change bowling ball)’ by Barbara Noah shows earth in a state of alarm. Noah achieves her effect by cutting three holes in a NASA photograph of our planet – one for its horror-stricken mouth and two for its panicky eyes.”

Other group exhibitions in which Barbara has recenty had work include the Second Annual Fine Art Exhibition at the Los Angeles Center of Photography last May and June, an exhibition at the Adobe Waterfront Gallery in the fall, and the 2017 Seattle Print Arts exhibit at the Schack Arts Center. She has also been in the last three anniversary exhibitions at The Alice Gallery in Seattle.

Barbara was recently a guest critic at the Gage Academy 2017 Atelier Critiques. Her work appears in the book Jim Olson: Art in Architecture, published by the Whatcom Museum and in Jim Olson Houses, by Monacelli Press. Her work is part of the John and Kim Shirley Collection.

Barbara was the recipient of Artist Trust’s THA Award for lifetime artistic achievement. The panelists who selected her wrote:
“The panel felt that Barbara Noah was an artist who had, throughout her years of creating work, maintained a consistent artistic voice – a voice that was not just universal, but also fresh and current. The panel admired her ability to adapt to technologies, while flawlessly maintain a personal vision, wit, and proficiency.”

Please contact Barbara through the Contact page regarding exhibitions, collections, publications, purchases, opportunities and other information, as well as to request being added to Barbara’s mailing and email lists.

 

All images and text ©Barbara Noah, except by other authors as noted. All rights reserved.